Tuesday, October 24, 2006

"Stable"

Does the phrase "stable author" mean an author who is not unstable, or a member of the agent's stable?

(I'm pretty sure it just means a trusted author/one that's been signed. I'm just wondering about the origin of the phrase)

I don't know the actual origin of the phrase, but it does not refer to the fact that the author is stable, mentally or in terms of output. It prefers to the fact that they are part of the "stable" of reliable earners on the client list. To be perfectly honest, I think "stable" is supposed to invoke the idea of ... a place where you keep horses.

....Yeah, I'm kind of grossed out, too.

8 comments:

Simon Haynes said...

Authors = Horses... You feed 'em a bit of hay and they run when you tell them to.

The Rejecter said...

I wish they did. "Remember what I said about getting the revision done in time for Penguin's deadline? Well, no hay until you do."

Simon Haynes said...

Maybe you should post them a glue stick to remind them what happens if they DON'T run on demand ;-)
Kind of like a horse's head, only a lot less messy.

billie said...

I have a quite lovely image of a well-appointed stable with writers sitting in each stall, typing away on laptops, the sweet smells of orchard hay and saddle soap wafting through the air... :)

However, I'm a writer who owns horses, and my horse gets treated like a King, so ... the phrase "stable of authors" actually has good connotations for me.

A tip... you really want the horses to run? Bring out the GRAIN. That gets them excited. :)

billie

Kimber An said...

Does this mean we get free carrots once we sign on? (tosses head and whinnies)

Cathy in AK said...

Does this mean if I get to be part of a stable someone will come muck out my house once in a while?

Simon Haynes said...

Only when it's knee-deep ...

Simon Haynes said...

Anyway, I thought it was only audiobook readers who got a little horse.